When CYA is Exposing Rather than Covering Your Assets

shutterstock_286288565.jpgI recently had the privilege of attending the National Plan Advisors Association (NAPA) annual conference where some of the best and brightest minds in the retirement plan industry gather to discuss best practices, pending and recent legislation, and industry trends. In one of the sessions it was noted that it is a fiduciary breach to make decisions just to protect yourself as a fiduciary. For me this was one of those “ah-ha” moments that made me sit back and think about the way that we make decisions as a co-fiduciary. Are we keeping the best interests of the participants first or focusing so myopically on fiduciary best practices from a CYA (cover your behind) perspective that we miss out on the big picture? Since I was forced to contemplate our process, I thought I would also share the basics of fiduciary duty with you as well.

 The plan is in place to serve the best interests of the
plan participants and their beneficiaries.
It’s as simple as that!

 One of the most important ERISA fiduciary rules is the exclusive purpose rule, established by ERISA Sections 403 and 404: “A fiduciary shall discharge his duties with respect to a plan solely in the interest of the participants and beneficiaries.” In order to fulfill your requirements of sole interest, ERISA established 4 guidelines for fiduciaries to follow.

  • The first is loyalty. To demonstrate this quality the fiduciary must act for the exclusive purpose of providing benefits to participants and their beneficiaries; and defraying reasonable expenses of administering the plan. In essence this guideline sums up that you work for your plan participants when running the 401(k) plan and it is your responsibility to make sure they get appropriate services for a reasonable fee.
  • The next is prudence. Fiduciaries must act with the care, skill, prudence and diligence under the circumstances then prevailing that a prudent man acting in a like capacity and familiar with such matters would use in the conduct of an enterprise of a like character and with like goals. This is where the advice of an investment professional can be the most valuable as it is expected for you- the fiduciary – to not just act with good intentions, but also with knowledge and care.
  • The third guideline is diversification of investments. Fiduciaries must diversify the investments of the plan so as to minimize the risk of large losses, unless under the circumstances it is clearly prudent not to do so. In my opinion, this is one of the most difficult demands to balance since most investors expect to have positive returns in their account every quarter despite market conditions or investment mix. However as the plan fiduciary, you have the responsibility to protect the participants from themselves.
  • The final guideline is to follow the plan’s governing documents. Fiduciaries must operate the plan in accordance with the documents and instruments governing the plan insofar as such documents and instruments are consistent with [ERISA] provisions. While this may seem like a “no-brainer”, it is in this guideline where I have seen the most common problems arise. We have seen everything from not having a signed plan document to incorrectly following the plan’s definition of compensation to mismatched vesting schedules.

In nearly all cases, plan fiduciaries act in the best interest of their participants through their actions without even thinking twice about it. However, there are very strict and expensive rules around making sure that you do so consistently and that you don’t inadvertently shift focus from them to you and your assets.

jamie kertis headshotJamie Kertis, AIF®, QKA
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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Reaching Your Hand Into the 401k Cookie Jar

shutterstock_291564959Caleb Bagwell, Education Specialist for Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial, does a wonderful employee education presentation where he compares accounts used for keeping money as cookie jars. For example, your checking account is a blue jar, your savings account is a yellow jar, and your 401(k) account is a green jar. From there he goes on to explain that the investments within those jars are the cookies; sugar cookies are a money market, chocolate chip domestic equity, white chocolate macadamia are internal equities, and so on. (For more Calebism’s check out his blog ) . So what happens when your blue checking account is running low and you need some more cookies ? A significant number of people turn to their green 401(k) jar because, after all, it is your money to begin with. Although, this may seem like a quick and easy fix, it can have long term negative effects on your ability to retire.

Should You Really Be Reaching Into the Jar?

T. Rowe Price recently conducted its eighth annual Parents, Kids, & Money survey and found that 44% of parents said that in the past two years they had used money saved for retirement for a non-emergency expense. Around 17% used the money to pay off debt which could be a semi-sound financial move depending on the interest rate of the debt paid off, but an equal amount, around 17%, said they had used the money to pay for vacation and 16% used the money for their children’s education. Let’s start with vacation. While I am an advocate for work-life balance and think that a well-deserved week away from the office does an employee good, a vacation falls into the category of “if you can’t pay for it, you shouldn’t do it”, especially if it means dipping into your retirement savings. Using your retirement savings to fund a child’s education can also be an inappropriate use of your money. While loan, particularly student loan, has become a four letter word, the truth is that your children have a much longer time span to pay off a student loan, then you have to save for retirement.

But They Are My Cookies to Begin With!

shutterstock_111436112.jpgOne of the most common arguments I hear as a reason to take loan from your 401(k) account is that is it you are paying yourself back rather than a financial institution. However, there are several reasons why this argument leads to a slippery slope. The first, and main reason, is you are paying yourself back with after-tax money and that money will be taxed again when you take it out in retirement as a distribution from your 401(k) account! To explain, If you are in the 25% tax bracket, earning $1 only gives you $0.75 toward repaying the loan, and that $0.75 will be taxed again when you retire and withdraw if from your plan. The second factor to consider is opportunity cost. Opportunity cost is the alternative that is given up when a choice is made; in regards to your 401(k) that cost is the potential market gain that you are missing out on while your money is out of the plan. A third reason to consider about taking out a 401(k) loan is that you have potentially handcuffed yourself to your current employer. The full balance of a loan becomes due when you terminate employment and if you cannot repay the total amount, then whatever you cannot pay back becomes a taxable distribution that is also subject to a 10% penalty if you are under age 59 1/2. First consider the fact that the term for most 401(k) loans is 5 years. Then consider that according to a 2015 study conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics that of the jobs that workers began when they were 18 to 24 years of age, 69% of those jobs ended in less than a year and 93% ended in fewer than 5 years and among jobs started by 40 to 48 year olds, 32% ended in less than a year and 69% ended in fewer than 5 years. Consider those 2 facts together and it is reasonable to think that the majority of employees who take out a 401(k) loan will not be at their employer long enough to be pay it back in full.

Just Say No

While the idea of dipping into your retirement savings to take care of a today need may be as tempting as biting into a warm chocolate chip cookie, in most cases it is best to just say no! Once you say no once to compromising your retirement savings, it will get easier and from there you can start to address the underlying reason why you probably needed the loan in the first place, the lack of sufficient savings. The T Rowe survey mentioned earlier also found that 72% of parents don’t have enough savings to cover at least 3 months of living expenses and 49% said they didn’t have an emergency account at all. We have some great resources that speak to the importance of budgeting and would be happy to help your employees start the process of setting and following a budget.

Cookies and 401(k) loans are tempting because they are usually easily accessible and have a certain level of immediate gratification. Let us at Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial help you find a better way to tame the temptation.

jamie kertis headshotJamie Kertis, AIF®, QKA
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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What the “F” ? – Part 4 – Future

wtf4What the “F” ?
A four part series that will address important themes of plan management

 If you’ve stayed with me through this four part series on the critical “F”s in 401(k) plan management (and thank you if you have), then hopefully you will agree that I have saved the best and most crucial “F” for last – Future. When you think about the last three “F”s , funds, fees and fiduciary, they all center around producing the best outcomes for the retirement future of your plan participants. Moreover, the main purpose of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) is to protect the assets of millions of Americans so that funds placed in their retirement plans during their working lives will be there when they retire. So much focus is placed on protecting, growing and maintaining the assets during work that it leaves us asking what happens when your participant is ready to retire with those assets that he or she has worked so hard to amass or worse yet, what happens when your employee starts to plan his or her retirement and realizes there is not enough there to allow them to retire.

First let’s focus on how to best assist your employee during their working career to earn, grow and protect their retirement assets. As we have discussed, making sure that the funds in your plan are appropriate to help asset growth, monitoring the fees in your plan to protect against plan asset erosion, and acting in the proper fiduciary manner in order to maintain a compliant plan are all steps that you can take to help your employees while they are participants in your company’s 401(k) plan. Additionally, many retirement plan recordkeepers offer tools and calculators that your participants can utilize to model the potential shortfall or overage that they will have in monthly income during retirement. To clarify, most tools will calculate 75% – 80% of the participant’s preretirement income and turn that into a monthly amount. From there, the tool will analyze how much the participant can expect to generate on a monthly basis from the balance of their retirement account considering both current and future contributions and average market performance. The more dynamic tools will also let the participant enter outside sources of income, model for social security, account for medical expenses, and more. The participant will then be able to fairly quickly determine if they will have an overage or a shortfall in monthly income in retirement. This tool is commonly referred to as “Gap Analysis” and if the plan that you work with does not currently offer something like it, it may be time to consider adding it.

Providing tools like Gap Analysis to your participants is a great first step; however, we believe that it is essential that you take another critical step in assisting your plan participants by offering a dynamic education plan that encompasses both informative group meetings and impactful one-on-one meetings. We believe that our industry as a whole has done a poor job of reaching out to the average participant in a way that makes very difficult and often intimidating financial concepts surrounding a 401(k) understandable. Therefore, we believe in some basic concepts when it comes to educating your participants. The first is a concept in education called “Chunking” whereby a person attempts to make sense of something complex by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable units. We attempt to take daunting items like asset allocation, asset classes, match structures and vesting schedules and explain them in a way that is relatable to most participants. Furthermore, we believe that it is imperative to not only engage the left brain, analytic side of the brain when describing investment concepts, but also to involve the right brain, emotional side to truly appeal to the participant. I’d be willing to bet that you have seen the look before in your employee’s eyes when you start into a dry or, dare I say boring, concept in an employee meeting and immediately the stares glaze over and the head nodding begins. By engaging the creative and emotional side of the brain, we have found that we get a much better engagement and communication in our employee education events which can lead to more action when it comes to making a decision to participate in the plan. Caleb Bagwell, our employee education specialist says, “Participants have been told their entire working life that they need to save.  It’s not a foreign concept to them.  The problem is that no one has taken the time to show them why! Why should they be using the 401(k)? Why can’t they depend on social security? We need to bridge the gap between the discomfort of delaying gratification now, and the payoff they will receive in retirement, and that bridge is built through education.”   I would encourage all of my readers to visit Caleb Bagwell’s blog, Motivated Monday, to learn more about how he is taking a fresh approach to engaging and inspiring employees to take a new look at their retirement futures.

Finally, when it comes to weighing the importance of your participant’s future against the immediate needs that are constantly pressing, we urge you to consider the potential cost that employees who cannot afford to retire may have on your business’s bottom line. We know and fully appreciate that there are situations where the experience, knowledge and wisdom that comes with long time employees cannot be replaced, but we are also fully aware, as should you be, that the more senior the employee the greater the potential for higher costs associated with that employee. These costs can include anything from greater absenteeism to higher salaries to increased medical costs. Case in point, we have a business contact who hired a practice manager over 6 years ago to streamline their operations in anticipation that many of the staff members that currently served in administrative roles would soon be retiring. Flash forward to today and that company now has the highly paid practice administrator that they hired 6 years ago along with all of the other 9 employees that were planning on retiring who cannot because they cannot afford to. This is an all too real situation that many companies find themselves facing, but we believe with proper education it can possibly be avoided.

John Adams, our second President, said “There are two educations. One should teach us how to make a living and the other how to live.” We could not agree with this statement more whole-heartedly when it comes to educating employees about their retirement futures. It is absolutely a balance between making your living and living the life you want now and in the future. If you feel like there may be a better way to help your employees achieve the future that they want, we’d love to hear from you.

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKA jamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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CPA Value to Their Clients

value.jpgWhile you are in the midst of finishing personal tax returns, filing extensions, viewing recordkeeper’s reports, sorting through transaction ledgers amongst countless other tasks associated with the normal course of your business, it may be tough to fathom stopping to ask yourself “What other value could I be adding to my clients?” So I have done that for you! Here are a few ideas that you can immediately add to your practice that could add additional value to your client relationships.

  1. Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan – If you are a CPA who works with high net worth individuals or business owners, simply mentioning the idea of a Nonqualified Deferred Compensation (NQDC) plan may be enough to spark your client’s interest. A NQDC plan is a type of savings plan that a business sets up that allows a select group of individuals to put away sums of money over and above what a traditional retirement plan allows. There are several forms of investments that a NQDC can utilize, including mutual funds and corporate owner life insurance, and you must have a plan document in place. However, as the name states because the plan is nonqualified there are not the same restrictions to contributions or participation and there is no annual compliance testing associated with this type of plan. It should be noted that NQDC plans are suitable only for regular (C) corporations. In S corporations or unincorporated entities (partnerships or proprietorships), business owners generally can’t defer taxes on their shares of business income. However, S corporations and unincorporated businesses can adopt NQDC plans for regular employees who have no ownership in the business. There are many more nuisances to a NQDC which we would be happy to help you explore if you have a client who is interested in learning more.
  2. Safe Harbor Features – If you audit a plan that consistently fails testing resulting in the highly compensated employees receiving refunds, it may be time for that plan to explore the options of adding a Safe Harbor feature to their plan design. A Safe Harbor 401(k) plan generally satisfies annual compliance testing. By satisfying annual compliance testing through either an approved matching formula or non-elective formula, the highly compensated employees are no longer at risk of receiving a refund of their deferral dollars.   The stated Safe Harbor match formula is 100% match on the first 3% of elective deferrals and 50% match of the next 2% deferred and the stated non-elective contribution formula is equal to a contribution of 3% of eligible compensation for all eligible employees regardless of participation. In both cases, the participants must be formally notified of the Safe Harbor provision through a notice and the contributions are immediately 100% vested.

  3.  Automatic Enrollment – Another idea that can help that plan who consistently fails compliance testing would be to suggest adding an automatic enrollment feature. In a our best case scenario of automatic enrollment, all eligible employees would be enrolled at 6% with an auto-increase feature up to 10%; but, even adding automatic enrollment at the more widely accepted 3%, the plan is taking steps to not only increase their chances of passing annual compliance testing, but also to help their employees become better prepared for retirement.

As a CPA working side-by-side on a business owner’s personal return or auditing a corporation’s benefit plans, you are in a unique position to provide guidance on areas slightly outside your scope of services that may have a meaningful impact on the retirement success of your client and further cement your already valuable relationship. The information provided on our 3 value-add ideas was brief and there are of course individual circumstances that could affect the appropriateness of the recommendations; therefore, please reach out to me if I can be of any further assistance in explaining.

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKA jamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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25 Interesting Facts About Millennials

1abThere were 53.5 million Millennials employed in the United States as of May 2015, and by 2025, this generation will comprise almost 75% of the US workforce. Think about that, in less than 10 years 3 out of 4 people who are working in America will be have born between 1980 and 2001.      How much do you know about this upward rising generation other than their stereotype? Yes, they are adults who still like to play video games.   Yes, they have no idea what a typewriter was used for.   And, yes they are technology-dependent, eco-friendly, hipsters who like music that no other generation can possibly tolerate; but there’s more.

Here are 25 things to think about as you recruit, hire and retain Millennial employees:

  1. Pay ranks first among job factors that matter most to this cohort. Meaningful work is second, positive relationships with co-workers third and flexibility fourth.
  2. 82% of Millennials did not negotiate their salary, either because they were uncomfortable doing so or didn’t realize it was an option.
  3. 37% of Millennials left their first full-time job within two years.
  4. 26% said a better salary would have kept them around longer; 17% would have stayed with a clearer sense of how to advance in the organization.
  5. 63% know someone who had to move back home because of the economy.
  6. Millennials list Google, Apple, Facebook, the US State Department and Disney as their top ideal employers.
  7. 94% enjoy doing work that benefits a cause.
  8. 63% want their employer to contribute to a social cause.
  9. 77% would prefer to do community work with other employees, rather than on their own.
  10. 57% want their organization to provide companywide service days.
  11. 47% had volunteered on their own in the past month.
  12. 75% see themselves as authentic and are not willing to compromise their family and personal values.
  13. $45,000 is the average amount of debt carried by Millennials.
  14. More than 63% of Millennial workers have a bachelor’s degree, but 48% of employed college grads have jobs that don’t require a four-year degree.
  15. 70% have “friended” their colleagues or supervisors on Facebook.
  16. $24,000 is the average cost of replacing a Millennial employee.
  17. 15% of Millennials are already managers.
  18. 56% wouldn’t work for an organization that blocks social media access.
  19. 69% believe it’s unnecessary to work from the office regularly.
  20. 41% have no landline phone access and rely solely on their mobile phone.
  21. 65% of Millennials say losing their phone or computer would have a greater negative impact on their daily routine than losing their car.
  22. 29% of Millennial workers think work meetings to decide on a course of action are very efficient. Compared to 45% of Boomers
  23. 54% want to start a business or already have done so.
  24. 35% have started a side business to augment their income.
  25. 80% of Millennials said they prefer on-the-spot recognition over formal reviews, and feel that this is imperative for their growth and understanding of a job.

1a.jpgThere is a lot of interesting facts here. I think we could use them in all sorts of contexts; think about it all specifically in terms of hiring employees and even more important for retaining them. Employee turnover costs skyrocketing. According to the Center for America Progress, the replacement cost of an employee who earns $30,000 to $50,000 a year is 20% of annual salary for those mid-range positions. So the cost to replace a $40k employee would be $8,000. For higher level employees, the replacement costs skyrockets to 150-200%.   For a $100,000 employee, the cost just to replace him/her can be easily $150,000.

The influence of a strong company culture is a huge factor that results can equate to what Gen Xers and Baby Boomers look at as loyalty.   Millennials can be long-term, engaged employees, but not at 1970, 1990 or even 2010 standards.   It is time to make some changes.   It will cost you too much not to.

Sources:

  • Society for Human Resource Management, The Brookings Institution, Dan Schawbel

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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What the “F” ? – Part 3 – Fiduciary

wtf3
What the “F” ?
A four part series that will address important themes of plan management  

Thus far we have looked at some complicated “F”s in funds and fees, in today’s blog we are going to address one of the most overused and misunderstood “F”s in our industry: fiduciary. The basic definition of fiduciary is any individual or entity that has, or exercises discretionary control over the management of the plan or the plan’s assets. A plan may have one than one fiduciary and/or one individual serving in more than one fiduciary capacity. From there, the functional definition of fiduciary goes in several different directions.

When assessing whether or not you fall into a fiduciary role using the functional test you must consider the following: even with no expressed appointment or delegation of fiduciary authority if you are considered in control or procession of authority over the plan’s asset, management, or administration than you are considered a functional fiduciary. Many times this will include members of the Employer’s Board of Directors or Trustees, voting and non-voting, with power to exercise discretion and control. One important distinction to make is that the person who performs administrative ministerial functions, such as processing payroll, approving distributions or loans, or submitting data for testing, is not considered a fiduciary. In other words, the president of the company is usually a fiduciary because he or she has the discretion to implement plan decisions and to hire parties to assist in the administration of the plan; while a payroll clerk is not a fiduciary if he or she is processing the payroll in the 401(k) vendor’s website.

As a plan fiduciary, you may also be presented with opportunities to hire or appoint additional co-fiduciaries. There are different varieties of co-fiduciaries including 3(16), 3(21) , and 3(38) fiduciaries. A 3(16) co-fiduciary acts as the plan administrator and is responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of the plan. Some functions may include determining the eligibility of employees, maintaining all plan documents and records, providing annual notices, rendering decisions regarding participant claims, and fixing plan operational errors. This may be confusing since we have already determined that the individual within your company that provides many of these administrative functions like sending out notices and approving distributions is not a fiduciary; the difference is in that a named 3(16) fiduciary is an individual outside of your company that provides these administrative duties without consulting you, the plan sponsor. A 3(21) fiduciary is a paid professional who provides investment recommendations to the plan sponsor, but the plan sponsor retains ultimate decision-making authority and approves or rejects the advice of the 3(21) fiduciary. There is no discretion given to the 3(21) fiduciary. A 3(21) provides investment advice on a regular basis to the plan that the plan sponsor relies on to make a decisions pursuant to a mutual agreement or understanding (written or not) that is specialized to the plan for a fee. Finally, a 3(38) fiduciary is an investment manager in that the investment manager has discretion to make changes in the plan investment line-up or allocation without consent of the plan sponsor. A 3(38) must be appointed in writing by contract. The main difference between a 3(21) and a 3(38) is discretion. It is also important to note that even if you as a plan fiduciary hire a 3(16), a 3(21), and a 3(38), you still cannot absolve yourself of your personal fiduciary responsibility.

If you’ve made it this far in the blog, I’m sure it is clear to you why the definition of a fiduciary is anything but clear and you may be asking yourself why you should take the time to even bother with trying to understand your role and whether or not you are or are not a fiduciary. The reason understanding your role and acting properly as a fiduciary can be so important is that fiduciaries who do not follow the basic standards of conduct may be personally liable to restore any plan losses to the plan, or to restore any profits made through improper use of the plan’s assets resulting from their actions. While this is very true and taken directly from the Department of Labor’s commentary on fiduciary responsibility, it can be hard for many plan fiduciaries to conceptualize because chances are you have not, do not, and will not ever know anyone who loses their home or personal assets over a fiduciary breach. Nonetheless, there are very real examples of plan fiduciaries who have cost their companies a significant amount of many and/or lost their job due to improper fiduciary management. Look no further than Caterpillar, Fidelity, Lockheed Martin, Intel, Boeing and State Farm for companies that have faced or are currently facing case action lawsuits involving the management of their respective 401(k) plans (not all cases have been settled, nor have all companies been found guilty).

Moreover, as a plan fiduciary you have the unique and important role of providing the greatest opportunity for retirement savings that most of your employees will have. By properly managing the plan, you are playing a vital part in helping your valued employees get to their retirement goals. Check out my next installment when we will look closer at this role you play in the ultimate “F”.

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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What is Your Millennial Employee Retention Strategy?

turnoverDoes your company have a millennial retention strategy? The rapidly growing millennial workforce is changing ideas of loyalty and employee retention in the workforce. According to the The Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016, two-thirds of Millennials express a desire to leave their organizations by 2020. Businesses must adjust how they nurture loyalty among Millennials or risk losing a large percentage of their workforces. Since most young professionals choose organizations that share their personal values, it’s not too late for employers to overcome this “loyalty challenge”. Companies that approach employee retention in the same way that they did even five years ago may lose their most valuable young talent; as our Employee Education Specialist, Caleb Bagwell wrote about just last week, the cost of replacing employees is high.

Here are 4 job drivers to implement into your company’s culture to influence Millennials in the workplace and how you can translate those concepts into effective employee retention programs.

Recognizing Generational Differences

Generational differences in the workplace has become a HR hot topic and for good reason.   More than one-in-three American workers today are Millennials (adults ages 18 to 34 in 2015), and this year they surpassed Generation X to become the largest share of the American workforce, according to 2015 Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. It is likely that experienced baby boomers approaching retirement may have different benefit and lifestyle priorities than your new millennial. While compensation and the quality of the work experience remain important across segments, failing to understand that different generations may have different expectations and preferences can lead to challenges at all levels of the organization. With the youngest baby boomer being age 52, doing the math lets you know that in 10 years, your company is going to look a lot different than it does today.   Utilizing a workforce leadership and education consultant to bridge the communication gap is integral to growing a sustained, experienced new group of employees.

Benefits and Compensation

gen diffMillennials are bringing to the table a new set of benefit expectations for you to examine; therefore, it can be easy to lose sight of traditional compensation and benefits. However, these areas still give employers an edge in recruiting and retention. One study discussed by SHRM found that 62 percent of Millennials would leave their jobs for better family benefits. The same study found that 41 percent indicated that a lack of family-friendly support had negatively impacted their work experience. As a result, it’s useful for companies to evaluate what their competitors are offering their employees. Are compensation and benefits on par with industry best practices or averages? Millennials need to feel valued and do not need any extra incentive to look for a job with your competitor. It is a good business practice for all generations of your employees to make sure their compensation and benefits are in line with industry standards.

Flexibility

The continued rise of trends like telecommuting, flexible scheduling, freelancing, and job sharing has shaped Millennials’ expectations of the workplace. As they advance in their careers, they’re more likely to be concerned about work-life balance, whether it’s in response to family demands, health, or outside interests. Companies that provide some level of flexibility are often able to hire more millennial talent by taking steps such as experimenting with unlimited vacation time and implementing structured telecommuting policies. While there are a wide variety of benefits around the idea of work-life balance, it’s important to be realistic about what works for your company, workflows, and culture. However, in general, the more you’re able to provide your workers with flexible benefits, the easier it may be to retain millennial employees.

Collaboration and Learning

shutterstock_126190568.jpgCollaboration and feedback are critical to keeping Millennials satisfied at work. Businesses are faced with how to make that crucial communication a reality. Finding ongoing ways to support learning and collaboration, from formal mentorship programs to investing in training programs, may also help increase retention. Today’s younger workers have a strong desire to contribute, but also want work-life balance, flexibility, and collaborative environments. By recognizing what energizes Millennials at work, it may be easier to create more effective employee retention programs.

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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