The Myth of the Year-End Conversion

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Here we are already in the middle of the third quarter; prime time for starting planning and projections for next year. If you are a member of your company’s investment or benefits committee that may mean you are considering making a provider change for 2018. And, chances are if you are considering making a change, you have an advisor urging you to make a decision now in order to get that change accomplished on January 1, 2018. However, as a former employee of a recordkeeper, let me encourage you to think twice about falling into the myth of the year-end conversion.

Back in the days of paper records and/or massive Excel spreadsheets, there was a necessity to transfer data at the end of a plan or calendar year in order to have a “fresh” start for the next year. That is not necessarily the case any longer. With the seamless, electronic transmission of records and the electronic retention of participant records, there is not the same sense of urgency to have the plan established at the new provider on the first day of the new year. Third party administrators, recordkeepers, and auditors are all more than capable of getting the information they need to perform their job functions from multiple sources. Granted there may be a little additional work required if gathering data from more than one source, but with the level of technology available to them, there should not be an issue.

One could even argue that a January 1 conversion could be the worst time to try to push your plan through a conversion since there is a sizeable number of 401(k) plans that are trying to do just that. Of course, that’s not to say that recordkeepers are not well equipped to handle an influx of new clients, but think about your own business. Isn’t there a great opportunity for mistakes or errors to happen when there is a higher volume of work to be done?

Another point to consider when aiming for a year-end conversion is that more than likely the “blackout period,” the amount of time that your participants will not be able to access their money for distributions including loans, will more than likely fall in or around the holiday season. There may need to be additional education for your employees to ensure they understand their ability to get to their money will be limited during the prime spending season.

Finally, reflect on the amount of additional work that your team who handles your 401(k) plan has at the end of the year. Chances are the same individuals at your company who are responsible for running the 401(k) plan are also preparing profit and loss statements, gathering information for year-end payroll, and handling a variety of other tasks that present themselves as the year draws to a close.

While there is no right or wrong answer to whether or not a year-end conversion is right for your plan, I would encourage you not to fall for the myth that you have to convert the plan on January 1. If you would like to discuss this matter further, please contact me at jamie@grinkmeyerleonard.com or 205-970-9088.

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