Friday Funny {May 5, 2016}

Bk0X2xhCIAAlT8AThis week’s Friday Funny isn’t as funny as it is true.

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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You cannot spell HERO without HR

hr2.jpgIt is not often when I am really caught off guard by a remark, but recently while attending a panel style discussion lead by three Human Resource Managers that also serve as 401(k) Plan Sponsors, one of them made a comment that threw me for a loop. She said, “People don’t realize what a lonely job being a Human Resource Manager can be.” She went on to elaborate on the fact that few, if any, members of a company can really appreciate all that the HR professional has to do throughout the day. The rest of the panel members agreed and listed off a myriad of tasks from personnel manager to staffing firm to marriage counselor that most members of human resources serve as besides their official written job description. In an effort to bring others into your personal world or to at least garner a better appreciation for what you do, here are a few much easier said than done ideas for HR professionals.

  1. Find a sidekick– The HR workforce is full of superheroes; and superheroes never need for help, right? Wrong! We all know that Batman had Robin and Wonder Woman had Wonder Girl. Therefore, it is so important that you finds an individual either within the organization or outside to assist with the tasks that you are too busy to tackle to help you free up some time to continue saving the world (or at least your company). Look to your advisers and product providers for resources that they can provide to help you do your best work.
  2. Ask for help – One of the hallmarks of an awesome HR professional is the level of care and selfness that they often exhibit; often to the point that they do not want to appear overwhelmed for the fear that they might burden another employee. However, by not asking anyone for help, you may be creating unnecessary work and/or stress for yourself down the line. Asking for help can also be a great way to involve those valued individuals who report to you by allowing them some extra responsibility.
  3. Delegate more – Delegating is the hardest task for me personally, since I like many hard-working professionals, think my way is often the best way. Recently though I have come to the realization that done beats perfect every time and my way isn’t necessarily the only way. While it is extremely important that tasks get done to your standards, it is also important that items that you do not love to do or are too busy to complete get done as well. Figure out the items that you can let go to free up time to do what you do best.
  4. Say “No” – While you may not be able to say no to the employee standing at your door or your boss demanding an immediate response to an email, there are ways to say little no’s throughout the day. Thinking of saying no to things like checking Facebook every 15 minutes or sitting in on a weekly meeting that does not impact the way you do business as a way to free up time. Also, consider turning your email off for an hour a day as a way to focus on completing outstanding projects. If you are one of those HR superheroes who feels like they could use a sidekick, I would love to talk to you about ways to find advocates and to ask for assistance. As a HR professional, you do so much for your company; isn’t it time for someone to help you?

 

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

Contact Jamie

Follow Jamie on LinkedIn

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25 Interesting Facts About Millennials

1abThere were 53.5 million Millennials employed in the United States as of May 2015, and by 2025, this generation will comprise almost 75% of the US workforce. Think about that, in less than 10 years 3 out of 4 people who are working in America will be have born between 1980 and 2001.      How much do you know about this upward rising generation other than their stereotype? Yes, they are adults who still like to play video games.   Yes, they have no idea what a typewriter was used for.   And, yes they are technology-dependent, eco-friendly, hipsters who like music that no other generation can possibly tolerate; but there’s more.

Here are 25 things to think about as you recruit, hire and retain Millennial employees:

  1. Pay ranks first among job factors that matter most to this cohort. Meaningful work is second, positive relationships with co-workers third and flexibility fourth.
  2. 82% of Millennials did not negotiate their salary, either because they were uncomfortable doing so or didn’t realize it was an option.
  3. 37% of Millennials left their first full-time job within two years.
  4. 26% said a better salary would have kept them around longer; 17% would have stayed with a clearer sense of how to advance in the organization.
  5. 63% know someone who had to move back home because of the economy.
  6. Millennials list Google, Apple, Facebook, the US State Department and Disney as their top ideal employers.
  7. 94% enjoy doing work that benefits a cause.
  8. 63% want their employer to contribute to a social cause.
  9. 77% would prefer to do community work with other employees, rather than on their own.
  10. 57% want their organization to provide companywide service days.
  11. 47% had volunteered on their own in the past month.
  12. 75% see themselves as authentic and are not willing to compromise their family and personal values.
  13. $45,000 is the average amount of debt carried by Millennials.
  14. More than 63% of Millennial workers have a bachelor’s degree, but 48% of employed college grads have jobs that don’t require a four-year degree.
  15. 70% have “friended” their colleagues or supervisors on Facebook.
  16. $24,000 is the average cost of replacing a Millennial employee.
  17. 15% of Millennials are already managers.
  18. 56% wouldn’t work for an organization that blocks social media access.
  19. 69% believe it’s unnecessary to work from the office regularly.
  20. 41% have no landline phone access and rely solely on their mobile phone.
  21. 65% of Millennials say losing their phone or computer would have a greater negative impact on their daily routine than losing their car.
  22. 29% of Millennial workers think work meetings to decide on a course of action are very efficient. Compared to 45% of Boomers
  23. 54% want to start a business or already have done so.
  24. 35% have started a side business to augment their income.
  25. 80% of Millennials said they prefer on-the-spot recognition over formal reviews, and feel that this is imperative for their growth and understanding of a job.

1a.jpgThere is a lot of interesting facts here. I think we could use them in all sorts of contexts; think about it all specifically in terms of hiring employees and even more important for retaining them. Employee turnover costs skyrocketing. According to the Center for America Progress, the replacement cost of an employee who earns $30,000 to $50,000 a year is 20% of annual salary for those mid-range positions. So the cost to replace a $40k employee would be $8,000. For higher level employees, the replacement costs skyrockets to 150-200%.   For a $100,000 employee, the cost just to replace him/her can be easily $150,000.

The influence of a strong company culture is a huge factor that results can equate to what Gen Xers and Baby Boomers look at as loyalty.   Millennials can be long-term, engaged employees, but not at 1970, 1990 or even 2010 standards.   It is time to make some changes.   It will cost you too much not to.

Sources:

  • Society for Human Resource Management, The Brookings Institution, Dan Schawbel

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

Contact Jamie

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An Investor’s Worst Enemy

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An Investor’s Worst Enemy

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

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Take Care of Your Employees

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Take care of your employees.

Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

Contact Jamie

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Be So Good

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Jamie Kertis, AIF®, QKAjamie kertis headshot
Retirement Plan Specialist
Grinkmeyer Leonard Financial
1950 Stonegate Drive / Suite 275 /Birmingham, AL 35242
Office: 205.970.9088 / Toll-Free: 866.695.5162
www.grinkmeyerleonard.com

Contact Jamie

Follow Jamie on LinkedIn

Follow Jamie’s Blog